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TUCoPS :: Phreaking Technical System Info :: narc8.txt

Basics of PBXs








                  +----------------------+
                  | N.A.R.C Info-File #8 |
                  |   Basics of PBX's    |
                  |       4/5/90         |
                  +----------------------+

                         Written by:
                         The Imortal

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PART I: Introduction

       This is a file typed up for beginners on PBXing.
If you know anything about PBX's at all this file will do
you no good at all. It is very basic. Hope this helps some
of you beginners. Now, on with the Gfile.

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PART II: What are PBX's?

       PBX's are telephone systems set up by very large
corporations to make long distance (LD) phone calls for free.
I have heard many definitions for PBX's:
-Public Brand Xchanges
-Personal Business Xchanges
-and a few other
Actually it stands for Private Branch Xchange [Useful to know
this when you are asked to define abbreviations on those
info-forms.

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PART III: How do PBX's Work?

       You should be familiar with 1-800 dialups already
[1-800-xxx-xxxx]. If not get a gfile called "Phreaking - For
the Beginners." These 1-800 allow dialups form mainly
anywhere in the United States. But, not in some Foreign
countries. It depends on what WATS line Company you are
using. WATS [Wide Area Telephone Service] Lines are offered
by AT&T at a rate of around $2000 dollars a month, which
allows and unlimited amount of phone calls to that companies
1-800 number. The PBX works almost the same as a MCI, SPRINT,
and other LD services work. It uses an INWATS [Inward Wats]
line t the employees [or phreakers in your case]
phone charge. Next, you dial the PBX, the computer on the
other end will pick up the phone automatically and send you a
tone [Similar to a dial tone]. This is when you enter you
code. Next, enter the long distance number you wish to call
[known as the Target Number]. If the code you entered is a
valid one, the computer will call the number automatically
and connect you too the BBS you wish to call. If you have a
friend that moved or just some one you want to chat with that
lives out of your area code. You can also do this without the
use of you computer, just do it manually on your receiver.

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PART IV: PBX's of The Past

       A few years ago, PBX's were constructed without codes
All you would have to do was call up the PBX [1-800-xxx-xxxx]
and enter the number you wished to call. But then, Companies
soon found out that their phones were being used by other
people than their employees. So, they decided to add a little
code to keep these people [Phreakershose were the
good 'ole days. But it hasn't stopped anybody yet. And they
never will.

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PART V: Dialing a PBX.

       To dial the PBX, get a blank screen on your
Communication package and type:

ATDT1800xxxxxxx,,,,,CODE,,Target.

Each comma tells the computer to pause for two seconds. You
will have to fool around with a few times to find out the
pauses. Also, you will have to experiment a little to find
the length of the code.

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PART VI: Conclusion

         That's all. If you need to get in touch with one of
the NARC members you can get a hold of them on one of the
following boards:
             1.) Nuclear Wasteland [Home of NARC]
             2.) Balanced pH
             3.) Critical Condition
             4.) Lost Souls Domain ][


                  (C)opyright 1989 N.A.R.C.


+- Shamefully Leeched from Nuclear Wasteland! -+



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