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TUCoPS :: Unix :: General :: bt1448.txt

Progress 4GL Compiler datatype overflow





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----- Original Message -----
From: "KF" <dotslash@snosoft.com>
To: "bugtraq" <bugtraq@securityfocus.com>
Sent: Friday, June 20, 2003 5:47 AM
Subject: SRT2003-06-20-1232 - Progress 4GL Compiler datatype overflow


> http://www.secnetops.biz/research
>
>
>


----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----


> Secure Network Operations, Inc. http://www.secnetops.com
> Strategic Reconnaissance Team research@secnetops.com
> Team Lead Contact kf@secnetops.com
>
>
> Our Mission:
> ************************************************************************
> Secure Network Operations offers expertise in Networking, Intrusion
> Detection Systems (IDS), Software Security Validation, and
> Corporate/Private Network Security. Our mission is to facilitate a
> secure and reliable Internet and inter-enterprise communications
> infrastructure through the products and services we offer.
>
>
> Quick Summary:
> ************************************************************************
> Advisory Number : SRT2003-06-20-1232
> Product : Progress 4GL Compiler
> Version : <= 9.1D06
> Vendor : progress.com
> Class : local / trivial remote
> Criticality : Medium (to all Progress users)
> Operating System(s) : WIn32, *nix
>
>
> High Level Explanation
> ************************************************************************
> High Level Description : Compiler datatype buffer overflow
> What to do : Do not compile untrusted Progress .p files
>
>
> Technical Details
> ************************************************************************
> Proof Of Concept Status : SNO has exploits for the described situation
> Low Level Description :
>
> Both the WIN32 and Unix variants of the Progress Application Compiler
> suffer from a buffer overflow in the definition of datatypes. The compiler
> can be accessed in a number of ways, for example using the "-p" option
with
> _progres or prowin32.exe, as well as from within the Procedure Editor.
>
> An example of a valid datatype would be "char", "integer", "date", etc.
> When the compiler attempts to parse an invalid datatype the user is
presented
> with the following message.
>
> ** Invalid datatype -- sample types are: char, integer, date, logical
(222)
> ** overflow.p Could not understand line 1. (196)
>
> Immediately after this message the application prompts the user to press
> the space bar to continue, then it promptly exits.
>
> If however the length of the invalid datatype is beyond 364 chars the
> Progress Compiler will segfault due to poor usage of memmove(). An example
> of such a data type is as follows.
>
> def var andrew as AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
> AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
> AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
> AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
> AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
> AAAAAAAAAAAA00001111
>
> In the above example 0000 is the location of the ebp and 1111 represents
> where we wish the eip to point to.
>
> On *nix platforms the _progres binary is suid root however the application
> does drop root privs before executing the .p file. Exploiting this issue
> would only grant privs of the user running _progres.
>
> On Win32 exploitation can occur from within the Progress Application
> Compiler tool which simply invokes "prowin32.exe -p". Again privs of the
> user running prowin32 would be obtained.
>
> This issue has added risk for Win32 users due to the fact that when using
> the Progress Application Compiler the user is prompted to supply a file
> or directory name for compilation. If a directory name if provided the
> compiler will search for *.p and attempt to compile every instance that is
> found. If compiling occurs from a shared drive this could become an issue
> because an attacker only need to drop a malicious .p file into the compile
> tree. Shortly after clicking the "Start Compile" button you will notice
> that the Progress Application Compiler is no longer responding if someone
> has planted such a file.
>
> The following output is a sample exploitation scenario.
>
> [elguapo@rootme dlc]$ cat /usr/dlc/version
> PROGRESS Version 9.1D05 as of Sun Feb  2 17:14:07 EST 2003
>
> [elguapo@rootme dlc]$ grep system compiler_exploit.pl
> system("echo $buf > overflow.p");
> system("gdb /usr/dlc/bin/_progres");
>
> [elguapo@rootme dlc]$ ./compiler_exploit.pl
> (gdb) r -p overflow.ped
> Program received signal SIGTRAP, Trace/breakpoint trap.
> 0x40000b30 in _start () from /lib/ld-linux.so.2
> (gdb) c
> Continuing.
> sh-2.05b$
>
> As you can see above executing code is fairly easy. The trick is getting
> the user to compile the malicious .p. Please note that the line triggering
> the overflow could easily be hidden amongst many thousands of lines of
> code thus making it difficult to determine the malicious intent. Obviously
> running /bin/sh would do an attacker no good however it is very easy to
> supply shellcode that binds a shell to a port for example.
>
> As a final note Progress does have the ability to "compile on the fly" so
> it may be possible for users of frontend Progress applications to cause
the
> server to execute malicious machine code.
>
> Vendor Status : Patch will be in a future release (v10 ?)
> Bugtraq URL : to be assigned
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> This advisory was released by Secure Network Operations,Inc. as a matter
> of notification to help administrators protect their networks against
> the described vulnerability. Exploit source code is no longer released
> in our advisories. Contact research@secnetops.com for information on how
> to obtain exploit information.
>
>

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Secure Network Operations, Inc.=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0 =
http://www.secnetops.com
Strategic Reconnaissance Team=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0 =
research@secnetops.com
Team Lead =
Contact=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=
=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0 kf@secnetops.com


Our Mission:
************************************************************************
Secure Network Operations offers expertise in Networking, Intrusion=20
Detection Systems (IDS), Software Security Validation, and=20
Corporate/Private Network Security. Our mission is to facilitate a=20
secure and reliable Internet and inter-enterprise communications=20
infrastructure through the products and services we offer.=20


Quick Summary:
************************************************************************
Advisory Number=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0 : SRT2003-06-20-1232
Product=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0 : Progress 4GL =
Compiler
Version=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0 : <=3D 9.1D06
Vendor=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0 : progress.com
Class=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0 : local / =
trivial remote
Criticality=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0 : Medium (to all =
Progress users)
Operating System(s)=A0=A0=A0=A0 : WIn32, *nix


High Level Explanation
************************************************************************
High Level Description=A0 : Compiler datatype buffer overflow
What to do=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0 : Do not compile =
untrusted Progress .p files


Technical Details
************************************************************************
Proof Of Concept Status : SNO has exploits for the described situation
Low Level Description=A0=A0 :

Both the WIN32 and Unix variants of the Progress Application Compiler=20
suffer from a buffer overflow in the definition of datatypes. The =
compiler
can be accessed in a number of ways, for example using the "-p" option =
with
_progres or prowin32.exe, as well as from within the Procedure Editor.=20

An example of a valid datatype would be "char", "integer", "date", etc.=20
When the compiler attempts to parse an invalid datatype the user is =
presented=20
with the following message.=20

** Invalid datatype -- sample types are: char, integer, date, logical =
(222)
** overflow.p Could not understand line 1. (196)

Immediately after this message the application prompts the user to press =

the space bar to continue, then it promptly exits.=20

If however the length of the invalid datatype is beyond 364 chars the=20
Progress Compiler will segfault due to poor usage of memmove(). An =
example=20
of such a data type is as follows.=20

def var andrew as =
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA=
A
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA=
A
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA=
A
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA=
A
AAAAAAAAAAAA00001111

In the above example 0000 is the location of the ebp and 1111 represents =

where we wish the eip to point to.=20

On *nix platforms the _progres binary is suid root however the =
application
does drop root privs before executing the .p file. Exploiting this issue
would only grant privs of the user running _progres.=20

On Win32 exploitation can occur from within the Progress Application=20
Compiler tool which simply invokes "prowin32.exe -p". Again privs of the
user running prowin32 would be obtained.=20

This issue has added risk for Win32 users due to the fact that when =
using=20
the Progress Application Compiler the user is prompted to supply a file
or directory name for compilation. If a directory name if provided the=20
compiler will search for *.p and attempt to compile every instance that =
is=20
found. If compiling occurs from a shared drive this could become an =
issue
because an attacker only need to drop a malicious .p file into the =
compile
tree. Shortly after clicking the "Start Compile" button you will notice
that the Progress Application Compiler is no longer responding if =
someone
has planted such a file.=20

The following output is a sample exploitation scenario.=20

[elguapo@rootme dlc]$ cat /usr/dlc/version
PROGRESS Version 9.1D05 as of Sun Feb  2 17:14:07 EST 2003

[elguapo@rootme dlc]$ grep system compiler_exploit.pl
system("echo $buf > overflow.p");
system("gdb /usr/dlc/bin/_progres");

[elguapo@rootme dlc]$ ./compiler_exploit.pl
(gdb) r -p overflow.ped
Program received signal SIGTRAP, Trace/breakpoint trap.
0x40000b30 in _start () from /lib/ld-linux.so.2
(gdb) c
Continuing.
sh-2.05b$

As you can see above executing code is fairly easy. The trick is getting
the user to compile the malicious .p. Please note that the line =
triggering
the overflow could easily be hidden amongst many thousands of lines of=20
code thus making it difficult to determine the malicious intent. =
Obviously
running /bin/sh would do an attacker no good however it is very easy to=20
supply shellcode that binds a shell to a port for example.=20

As a final note Progress does have the ability to "compile on the fly" =
so=20
it may be possible for users of frontend Progress applications to cause =
the=20
server to execute malicious machine code.=20

Vendor Status=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0 : Patch will be in a future =
release=A0 (v10 ?)
Bugtraq URL=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0 : to be assigned

------------------------------------------------------------------------
This advisory was released by Secure Network Operations,Inc. as a matter
of notification to help administrators protect their networks against
the described vulnerability. Exploit source code is no longer released
in our advisories. Contact research@secnetops.com for information on how
to obtain exploit information.


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