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TUCoPS :: Networks :: arpanet3.txt

Hacking Arpanet Part 3





***************************************

      Hacking ARPANET -- Part III

                  by

              The Source


***************************************

     ARPANET can't be faulted for the
amount of information it is willing to
disclose to anyone who knows the number
of a dial-up and knows enough to type in
"@N" and then follow directions.  But
the EXEC is, after all, limited to
managing inter-computer phone calls.
Even more interesting material is
available once you get onto what is
known as one of the network's "server"
computers.

OPENING THE DOOR
----------------

     Once you have reached the Exec on a
TIP, getting the door to a server
machine to open to you is no problem.
At the "@" prompt type "O" for open
followed by a space and then by two
numbers separated by a comma.  The
numbers represent the address of a
computer system.  The first number may
be from 0 to 3, and the second number
may range from 0 to 15:

     @O 0,11
     <the Exec responds:>
     TCP Trying...SU-AI WAITS 9.17/H
Assembled 06/17/84
     .Open

The ".Open" shows that you're in.  There
is a great deal you can do at this
level, and you don't even have a
password yet -- as far as the system
knows, you're still "anonymous guest"!
Most server systems operate under the
UNIX operating system, so any good
manual on UNIX should tell you more than
you need to know.  But now that we've
reached Stanford University's Artificial
Intelligence Lab (having been switched
there by SRI, formerly Stanford Research
Institute), let's take a look at what's
available.  First, list the HELP files:

.HELP
Job 3    SU-AI WAITS 9.17/H  Assembled
06/17/84
Type HELP followed by any of the
following, then carriage return:
ACCESS  COMPIL  EDITOR  HOSTS
MICROS  PPK     SORT    UNDELE
ACCOUN  COPY    EDKEY   HOWBIG
MIDAS   PPSAV   SOS     UNPROT
ACRONY  CPRINT  EFTP    IIIPOX
MLISP   PRESS   SOUP    VERIFY
ADA     CRDIR   EKL     ILISP
MLISP2  PRINT   SPASM   WEAVE
ADAEDT  CRE     EMACLS  IMPRIN
MONCOM  PRLISP  SPINDL  WEB
AL      CREF    ESC     INTERN
MOORE   PROLOG  SPOOL   WHEN
ALIAS   CRYPT   ESCAPE  JARGON
MUSIC   PROTEC  SRCCHK  WHERE
ARKTEX  CSD     ET      KILL
NCOMPL  PROVE   SRCCOM  WHO
ARM     D       ETEACH  KJOB
NET     PRUNE   STICKY  WHOLIN
ARPA    DART    ETV     KRL
NETDOC  PTYJOB  SUTIP   WHOPHN
ARPANE  DDFONT  EVENT   L
NETWRK  PUMPKI  SYMBOL  WL
ASSIGN  DDKEY   EXT     LATER
NEWIO   PUPTIM  SYSTEM  XGP
ATSIGN  DDQ     FAIL    LATEX
NEWS    RCV     TALK    XGPSYG
ATTACH  DED     FASBOL  LAWS
NOEKEY  REMIND  TANGLE  XGPSYN
BAIL    DFTP    FCOPY   LEDIT
NOTEBK  RENAME  TECO    XGPTYP
BATCH   DIAL    FELT    LIFE
NSL     RESOLV  TELNET  XIP
BBOARD  DIALNE  FILES   LIFXGP
OPTION  RESTOR  TEMPER  XPART
BIBOP   DIR     FIND    LINGO
P       RETRY   TERMINK10
PAM     SAIL    TEX78   YUMYUM
BMP     DISPLA  FONT    LISP
PASCAL  SAVE    TEX82   Z80
BOISE   DM      FORWAR  LIST
PASSWO  SCHEME  TFM     ZERO
BOOK    DMKEY   FRAID   LOADAV
PC      SCIP    TIP     370
BOYER   DO      FTP     LOGIN
PCP     SCRIBE  TTY     6500
CANCEL  DOC     GEOMED  LOGOUT
PHONE   SD      TTYCMD  6800
CANON   DOVER   GRIPE   MACLIS
PHONES  SEND    TTYESC  8080
CC      DRAW    GRUMP   MACLSP
PIX     SERVIC  TTYSET
CHARGE  DRD     GUEST   MAIL
PK      SIMPLE  TVFONT
CHRMAC  DSKSIZ  H19KEY  MAP
PLAN    SLAC    TYPE
CKMAIL  DTN     HELP    MAXTEX
POLL    SLR1    TYPREL
COLIST  E       HELPER  METAFO
PONY    SNAIL   UDPUFD
COMBIN  ECL     HOST    MF
POX     SNOBOL  UFD
Type "HELP HELPER" for one-line
descriptions of most of the HELP
messages.

MORE HELP
---------

     If you'd like, try "HELP HELPER"
for yourself.  Meanwhile more detailed
listings of some help files follow.
 .....
 .HELP GUEST
There is no general guest account on
this system.  There are some commands
that can be given without an account, as
listed below.  If you need to know more
about any of these, type "HELP
<topic><carriage return>".  For
information on special control
characters and commands, type "HELP
TTY".
 WHO, FINGER, WHERE, WHEN provide
information about people and jobs
currently running.
 MAIL, SEND, GRIPE permit you to send
messages and converse with people on the
system.  (You can use SEND to ask
someone who is logged in to form a
two-way link with you.)
 DIR lists the files in specified
directories.
 TYPE lets you type out the contents of
text files.
 FIND searches text files and prints
those paragraphs that contain specified
keywords.
If you need to do more than the above
programs permit, say "HELP LOGIN".

 .HELP NETDOC
Job 5    SU-AI WAITS 9.17/H  Assembled
06/17/84
(Much network information is available
from the Network Information Center at
SRI-NIC.  Please consult the network
liaison, Martin Frost (ME), for more
information about the network or the
resources available to you at the NIC.)
A large library of source and
documentation files about the network,
NOT including the host table, live on
the [S,NET] directory.  Even more
hardcopy documentation is available in
the bookshelf in ME's office for the
general SAIL community (please ask ME
before borrowing anything).  The host
table files can be found on [HST,NET].
The NETWRK library of network
subroutines can be found in
NETWRK.FAI[S,NET] and NETWRK.MID[S,NET].
     Some interesting files are:
HOSTS.TXT[HST,NET]      The source of
the host table
SUAI.TXT[S,NET]         Our write-up in
the Arpanet Resource Handbook.
     Most of the network user-level
documentation is contained in the
Monitor Command Manual, which can be
found online by giving the monitor
command READ MONCOM<cr>.  Large online
directories of network documetation
exist at SRI-NIC as <NETINFO> and MIT-DMS
as NETDOC;.
     Type HELP NETWRK for information on
programming for the network.
Kjob

 ...HELP HOST
Job 5    SU-AI WAITS 9.17/H  Assembled
06/17/84
The HOST command is used to look up
information in the host table about a
particular host name or host number.
This information includes the official
name of the host if the name is a
nickname, all host numbers known for
that host, whether the host is a user or
a server, the host machine and the host
operating system.
     To use HOST, type HOST followed the
host name (or any abbreviation) you want
to look for, or the host number, and
return.  The program will print all
hosts (and nicknames) which match the
input specification.  A null
specification will type out the entire
host table, but only if you are logged
in.  For example:
        .HOST MIT-MC
(describe MIT-MC)
        .HOST CMU
(describe all CMU sites)
        .HOST 36.40.0.194
(describe Internet host 36.40.0.194)
        .HOST 50#302
(describe SU Ethernet host 50#302)
        .HOST                   (print
out the host table)
Note that even non-unique abbreviations
are accepted.  For example "SU" will
print out ALL of the Stanford University
hosts.  This is different from TELNET,
etc., which only accept abbreviations
which are unique to a single host.
Kjob

(In Hacking ARPANET Part IV we'll report
on some more important help files.)
 example "SU" will print out ALL of the
Stanford University hosts.  This is
different from TELNET, etc., which only
accept abbreviations which are unique to
a single host.


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