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TUCoPS :: General Information :: hacker16.txt

Hacker's atlas of the world




   Feature Sections - Menu       :
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 [1]...Krakowicz's Kracking Korner
 [2]...Software Documentation
 [3]...Software Documentation Vol.2
 [4]...Telecommunications Info
 [5]...Miscellaneous stuff
 [6]...Adventure Hints & Solutions
 [7]...Fantasy Adventure Soft-Docs

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<#>  Date          Topic name
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[1]  03/20 AE Macros
[2]  03/20 Extenders List
[3]  03/20 Loops
[4]  03/20 Three Way Phones
[5]  04/20 Main Frame Numbers
[6]  03/20 Equal Access Info
[7]  03/20 History of ESS
[8]  03/20 Metro Access Numbers
[9]  05/19 Hackers Atlas //
[10] 06/08 PBX Tutorial

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    %*%*%*%*%*%*%*%*%*%
    *                 *
    % HACKER'S  ATLAS %
    *                 *
    %*%*%*%*%*%*%*%*%*%
    *                 *
    %*%*%*%*%*%*%*%*%*%

    WRITTEN BY : THE WYVERN
    DONATED TO : THE GRAVEYARD
                 202-396-4137

#^#^#^#^#^#^#^#^#^#^#^#^#^#^#^#^#^#^#^#

NOW INTO THE SUBJECT OF HACKING , THIS
FILE SHOULD GIVE ALL OF YOU PEOPLE OUT
THERE WHO ARE BORED AND HAVE NOTHING TO
DO, SOMETHING TO DO... IF IT DOESNT
THEN I GUESS IT DOESNT. LOOK FOR ISSUE
2 WHICH IS COMMING SOON.

HOW BOUT SOME INTERNATIONAL NUMBERS?

QUEEN ELIZABETH LOVES TO TALK TO
COMPUTER HACKERS AND CAN USUALLY BE
REACHED AT 011-441-930-482...

SOME OTHER MISC ONES :

LODON RADIO 44-1-246-8035
DIALING INSTRUCTIONS 44-1-246-8017
CIVIL EMERGENCIES 44-1-246-8088

A FUN THING TO DO IS....SOMETIMES WHEN
YOU ARE CALLING A FRIEND, BOARD OR
WHATEVER YOU WILL GET A CROSS LINE
(USUALLY LONG DISTANCE) WHERE YOU CAN
HERE SOME OTHER LOZERS TALKING, WELL
ITS PRETTY FUN TO LISTEN INTO THEIR
CONVERSATIONS...I HAVE HEARD SOME VERY
INTERESTING ONES...IF YOU ARE LUCKY
THEY WILL BE ABLE TO SORTA HEAR YOU,
AND THATS WHEN YOU DO STUFF LIKE "THIS
IS AN EMERGENCY INTERUPTION, PLEASE
HANG UP IMEDIATLY AND PREPARE FOR AN
EMEGENCY CALL" OR START CUSSING THEM
OUT OR ANYHTING YOU WANT TO DO!

SO ANYWAY FOR ALL YOU DIAL-A-"NUTS" OUT
THERE YOU MIGHT AS WELL PICK UP SOME
NEW INTERESTS AND CALL

 DIAL-A-FAG 415-685-6790
 DIAL-A-TEENAGER 714-346-7673
 DIAL-A-ATHEIST 213-254-4914
 DIAL-A-IDIOT   212-934-9090

MAYBE YOUR THE KIND THAT LIKES TO
LISTEN TO RECORDINGS? WELL THEN HOW
ABOUT CALLING 512-472-9941 AND
LISTENING TO THE "INSERT 25 CENT"
RECORDING A COUPLE HUNDRED TIMES?

HERE ARE SOME CARRIER NUMBERS IN 805

683-3831
    3832
    3833
    3834
    3835

AS FAR AS I KNOW THEY ALL BELONG TO
A CORP. CALLED SIGNAL TECH., THE FIRST
ONE IS AT LEAST, HIT RETURN A FEW TIMES
AND THERE YOU ARE, HACKING TIME.

SHEESH? STILL BORED EH? WELL WHY NOT
GO AHEAD AND GET ONA 6 WAY CONFERENCE
!??! GTE ON FROM 7-9PM (EASTERN STAND.)
301-736-3070....

OPERATOR TRUNK [LR*2II)X]

(TRY THESE IN THAT TRUNK!)

CONFERENCE OPERATOR  XXX+11511
COIN REFUND OPERATOR XXX+181

NAW, YOUR THE 800 EXTENDER TYPE EH?
WELL GET OUT YOUR PROGRAM AND HACK
THESE BABYS:


1-800-221-1950
          8190
          5670
          5430
          5665
      223-7854
      243-7854
      255-2255
      327-0005
          0326
          2703
          6713
          9136
          9895
      547-6754
      237-2618 (CODE : 115342 MAY WORK)

WELL IM NOT SURE WHICH NUMBER IT IS
BUT ITS EITHER

1-805-965-3608
          6308

ANYWAYS THATS SOME STATE FARM INSURANCE
RECORDING MACHINE, AND AS FAR AS I KNOW
YOUR PHONE BUTTONS 0-9 WILL DO STUFF
LIKE REWIND, FAST FORWARD, READ, LEAVE
MSGS, ETC, ILL HAVE MORE INFO ON IT IN
THE NEXT ATLAS!

EXTENDERS....322-1415, 255-2255
NEWSNET......215-668-2645
XEROX COMPUTING 312-922-4601
ON:XC56TS
PW:[HIT RETURN]

800-621-3026    SPECIAL OPERATOR
205-235-6205    ARMY POST
713-241-6421    SHELL OIL
800-323-7751    MCI MAIL
800-233-3312
800-223-2283    CITY BANKS
800-223-3450    WUI SAFE

SAY GUYS HERE ARE SOME BEAUTY GIVE
AWAYS FOR YOU :

WARNER 228-3333 (PWS ON KNOWN (AWW))

ACCURAY (K00L SYSTEM)
261-2140
ENTER
GAMES

???????
436-9687
6/24
JOHN12

OHIO STATE
LIBRARY...
(LOGON IN HALF DUP.)
422-5025
(MORE ON USING THIS IN NEXT ATLAS)

ALL OF THE ABOVE ARE IN THE 614 AREA
CODE. IN THE NEXT ATLAS THE NUMBER
FOR WENDY'S COMPUTER!

MISC. 614-481 EXCHANGE :

8049
8194
8754
8764
8771

(ALL ABOVE WITH CARRIER)

TRAVELNET : 800-521-8400 (VOICE 800
EXTENDER)

[) HEY GUYS! THESE GUYS LOVE YOU:

   THE PENTAGON......202-694-0814
   WATERGATE.........202-965-2900
   WHITE HOUSE.......202-456-1414

HERE ARE SOME PRESSES FOR YOU TO CALL:

RONNIE'S PRESS 800-424-9009 (?)
WHITE HOUSE "  800-248-0151

HERE ARE SOME REAL NICE ONES:

213 AREA CODE

974-6624    DEATH RECORDS INFO
    6621    BIRTH REOCRDS INFO

*** MORE MISC. NUMBERS ***

LOWELL U....617-459-0159
RECORD A VOICE....800-858-9313

*** A FEW EXTENDERS ***

1-800-547-1784
      323-8126
      521-8000
      743-7481


THAT'S IT! WATCH FOR HACKER'S ATLAS II
SOON!

Courtesy of The Shaolin Temple
408/997/0440

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View: PBX SYSTEM TUTORIAL

             Steve Dahl
                AND
        The Legion Of Doom!
              Present:

  PBX's (Private Branch Exchanges)
           Local and WATS

   Because of the danger of using a
blue box, many phreakers have turned
to MCI, sprint, and other SCC's in
order to get free calls. However, these
services are getting more and more
dangerous, and even the relatively
safe ones like metrofone and all-net
are beginning to trace and bust people
who fraudulantly use their services.
However, (luckily), there is another,
safer way. This is the local and WATS
PBX. If you have a modem or interface
for your computer capable of tone dial-
ing, you can find and make good use of
a great many of these "useful" numbers.
If you don't have the hardware, it is
still possible, although it would be a
VERY tedious process.
   The PBX, or private branch exchange,
is a private switchboard set up in
office buildings, hotels, etc.  It
allows people within the PBX to dial
other exchanges directly, to place out-
going calls (what we're interested in),
and sometimes to transmit their voice
ver the intercom system (lots of
PHUN!)  There will at least 1 line
going out of the PBX to the telco set
up for outgoing calls only, and there
will also be at least one incoming line
to the switchboard. This is what we are
interested in. Some of the incoming
lines are always answered by the
switchboard operator, but some will be
answered by the PBX equipmemt. It will
usually answer with a dialtone, the
tone will sound different for different
systems. Some even answer with a
synthesized voice! (These are very hard
to find, though.) The ones which answer
with a dialtone are easy to find if
you have a modem or hardware device
which can "hear" what's going on on
the phone line.
   To find these fun thingies, you
will have to write a scanner program
which will dial each number in a pre-
fix, either sequentially or in a random
order, it really doesn't matter, and
"listen" on the line for a constant
sound longer than the normal length of
a ring. This could be done manually
but it would take a hell of a long
time. Whenever the program finds a
number that makes a constant tone
longer than a ring, it should record
the number in an array or something.
Now, this number can be one of a few
things. A noisy answering machine, a
sprint, MCI, etc access node, a person
who yells in the fone, the tone side of
a loop (nice), possibly a carrier if
your modem can "hear" tones that high,
or, hopefully, a PBX line. All your
scanning should be done between 6 PM
and 7 AM because between 7 AM and 6 PM,
many of these numbers will be answered
by the switchboard operator. When you
are checking out your results the next
day and come accross a dialtone, enter
some touch-tone (TM) digits. Depending
on which type of PBX equipment and the
length of the codes, after 3-8 digits
it should either give a busy signal,
a "reeler tone" (high-low tone), or
hang up on you, or possibly tell you
you entered a bad code. Now it is time
to write a hacker for this PBX. If the
codes are 3 or 4 digits, there will
most likely only be one code, but if
they are 5 or more digits there may
be more than one. If there are 3 or 4,
your hacker should dial the access
number, wait for a dialtone, then dial
the digits and wait for a second,
then dial a "1" (the reason for this
will be explained shortly), and then
"listen" for a dialtone. This would
be a hacker for a system that gives
a reeler tone, listening for the dial-
tone and hearing it would really mean
the presence of the reeler tone and
mean that a bad code had been entered.
The reason 1 is entered is to "quiet"
the dialtone"  If it was a good code,
1XX or 1XXX will be valid extentions
on practically all PBX's. If your
system gives a re-order or hangs up
after a bad code, forget the one and
just listen for a dialtone, this will
be a good code. If there are 3 or 4
digits, they should be tried sequen-
tiallly (becuase there will probably
only be one good one), if there are
more, take your pick between random and
sequental. Now, when you (finally!!)
get a good code, you will call the
number and enter the code and be
confronted with a second dialtone. THIS
IS THE EXACT SAME DIALTONE THAT ANYONE
WHO PICKS UP A PHONE IN THAT PBX SYSTEM
GETS. The reason this is important is
because if they want to make an out-
going call, they will usually pick up
the fone and dial 8, 9, or sometimes 7,
and get another dialtone and then make
their call, local or long distance. And
you can do the same thing right now!
These numbers also make a good tool to
avoid being traced on telenet, etc, it
will just be traced back to the
company which owns the PBX.
  Now for some phun with the PBX you
have just broken into to. You can dial
all extentions directly on it (which
is what local PBX'S are primarially
used for legitimately, unless the com-
pany has OUTWATS lines.)  The most
phun extention of all is the PA system.
On some of these, you can get on the
PA (intercom) and actutually talk over
it from your house! It can be on almost
any extention though, so you may have
to hunt for it. On some, 797 or 1234
used to work, but those have mostly
been eliminated, not due to phreakers
but because people inside the company
were figuring them out and using them!
  Some PBX's don't even have security
codes, you can just call up and dial
9 and call wherever you want. On a few
that I know of you enter the number
and then the code. If you want to know
what these systems "sound" like, there
are files on this and other systems
with long lists of WATS PBX numbers.
The local ones are much safer to hack
though because you are not making a
whole bunch of 800 calls which tends
to get bell very pissed. Also, I have
actually found modems and other wierd
things on some exchanges of PBX's, it
might be worthwhile to scan the numbers
inside the PBX once to see what you
find.
  An important safety note: if you
heavily abuse a PBX and make many
outgoing calls on it, after a few
weeks (or whenever their fone bill
shows up!) it is a good idea to lay off
of it for a couple of months or so
because they could get a trace on it
easilly, just like 800's. They will
usually just change the code, though.
  One more interesing note, I once
found a PBX which had a direct link-
up to sprint! So by dialing 8 I got
a line to sprint, no access codes,
just area code and number. It's phun
to phuck up sprint and have them not
know who the hell you are or where the
hell you are!!

  If you have any comments, sug-
gestions, corrections, or questions,
leave e-mail to Steve Dahl on any major
phreak board, I will be happy to reply.


                           Steve Dahl
                           5/1/84

This phile is copyrighted 1984 by
LOD/PNET Telecommunications and Steve
Dahl and is not to be re-posted w/out
the author's consent!
(>
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       METROPHONE ACCESS NUMBERS


ANAHEIM, CA               (714)527-7055
ATLANTA, GA               (404)223-1000
AUSTIN, TX                (512)474-6057
BALTIMORE, MD             (301)659-7700
BEAUMONT, TX              (713)833-9331
BOSTON, MA   

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$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
$                                     $
$         THE HISTORY OF ESS          $
$         --- ------- -- ---          $
$                                     $
$                                     $
$      Another original phile by:     $
$                                     $
$                                     $
$$$$$$$$$$$$-=>Lex Luthor<=-$$$$$$$$$$$
$                                     $
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
 
 
 
   Of all the new 1960s wonders of
telephone technology - satelites, ultra
modern Traffic Service Positions (TSPS)
for operators, the picturephone, and
so on - the one that gave Bell Labs the
most trouble, and unexpectedly became
the greatest development effort in
Bell System's history, was the
perfection of an electronic switching
system, or ESS.
 
   It may be recalled that such a
system was the specific end in view
when the project that had culminated
in the invention of the transistor had
been launched back in the 1930s. After
successful accomplishment of that
planned miracle in 1947-48, further
delays were brought about by financial
stringency and the need for further
development of the transistor itself.
In the early 1950s, a Labs team began
serious work on electronic swithcing.
As early as 1955, Western Electric
became involved when five engineers
from the Hawthorne works were assigned
to collaborate with the Labs on the
project. The president of AT&T in 1956,
wrote confidently, "At Bell Labs,
developement of the new electronic
switching system is going full speed
ahead. We are sure this will lead to
many improvements in service and also
to greater efficiency. The first
service trial will start in Morris,
Ill., in 1959." Shortly thereafter,
Kappel said that the cost of the whole
project would probably be $45 million.
 
   But it gradually became apparent
that the developement of a commercially
usable electronic switching system -
in effect, a computerized telephone
exchange - presented vastly greater
technical problems than had been
anticipated, and that, accordingly,
Bell Labs had vastly underestimated
both the time and the investment needed
to do the job. The year 1959 passed
without the promised first trial at
Morris, Illinois; it was finally made
in November 1960, and quickly showed
how much more work remained to be done.
As time dragged on and costs mounted,
there was a concern at AT&T and some-
thing approaching panic at Bell Labs.
But the project had to go forward; by
this time the investment was too great
to be sacrificed, and in any case,
forward projections of increased
demand for telephone service indicated
that within a phew years a time would
come when, without the quantum leap
in speed and flexibility thaty
electronic switching would provide, the
national network would be unable to
meet the demand. In November 1963, an
all-electronic switching system went
into use at the Brown Engineering
Company at Cocoa Beach, Florida. But
this was a small installation,
essentially another test installation,
serving only a single company. Kappel's
tone on the subject in the 1964 annual
report was, for him, an almost
apologetic: "Electronic switching
equipment must be manufactured in
volume to unprecedented standards of
reliability.... To turn out the
equipment economically and with good
speed, mass production methods must
be developed; but, at the same time,
there can be no loss of precision..."
Another year and millions of dollars
later, on May 30, 1965, the first
commercial electric centeral office
was put into service at Succasunna,
New Jersey.
 
   Even at Succasunna, only 200 of the
town's 4,300 subscribers initially had
the benefit of electronic switching's
added speed and additional services,
such as provision for three party
conversations and automatic transfer
of incoming calls. But after that, ESS
was on its way. In January 1966, the
second commercial installation, this
one serving 2,900 telephones, went into
service in Chase, Maryland. By the end
of 1967 there were additional ESS
offices in California, Connecticut,
Minnesota, Georgia, New York, Florida,
and Pennsylvania; by the end of 1970
there were 120 offices serving 1.8
million customers; and by 1974 there
were 475 offices serving 5.6 million
customers.
 
   The difference between conventional
switching and electronic switching
is the difference between "hardware"
and "software"; in the former case,
maintenence is done on the spot, with
screwdriver and pliers, while in the
case of electronic switching, it can
be done remotely, by computer, from
a centeral point, making it possible
to have only one or two technicians
on duty at a time at each switching
center.
 
   The development program, when
the final figures were added up, was
found to have required a staggering
four thousand man-years of work at
Bell Labs and to have cost not
$45 million but $500 million!
 
                The End
Lex Luthor

Courtesy of The Shaolin Temple
408/997/0440

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* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
TESTS START FOR LONG DISTACE
" EQUAL ACCESS "  SWITCHING
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
FROM: <S><C><A><N><*><M><A><N>
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 


Well, I'm sure most of you phreaks have
heard many rumors about gaining access
to MCI, SPRINT etc...

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Downloaded from Just Say Yes. 2 lines, More than 500 files online!
         Full access on first call. 415-922-2008 CASFA 

 
 
 


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