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TUCoPS :: Antique Systems :: vmsptuto.txt

The IBM VMSSP system (303x, 308x)




               ====================
               THE IBM VMSSP SYSTEM
               ====================
                    PART ONE
                      BY
                 THE MOTORHEAD
 
INTRODUCTION
------------
     IBM's VMSSP mainframe operating system is for one of the most sophistocated computers available today, the IBM 303x and 308x families of processors.  These computers can handle vast quantities of memory, handle hundereds of users logged in at one tim
e, plus access many high-volume hard disks at once.  To someone who has only used an Apple, a VMSSP computer would definitely fit the title 'supercomputer'.  This series of tutorial text files will attempt to give the reader enough knowledge about the sys
tem to perform some usefulddestructivewwhatever tasks on hishher own.
 
LOGGING IN
----------
     Logging onto the computer is, of course the first and most important step. The first thing you have to find is a valid username.  This can be hard to do, because there is, to my knowledge, no way of seeing who is on a system before you have logged in
.  Very clever for security, but not too friendly for the average userhhacker.  If you need to hack out a username, they are from 1 to 8 characters long, and have a 1-to-8 character password associated with them. Start out by trying such common first and 
last names like 'Jones', etc.
     The login command on a VMSSP system is, quite simply, LOGIN (or LOGON). You would issue the login command like this:
          .LOGIN <username> [<password>]
(The '.' is the prompt, and <password> is optional;  if you don't supply a password, the system will prompt you for one.)  If the username you have tried isn't valid, you will get the message:
          DMKLOG053E <userid> NOT IN CP DIRECTORY
If the password you've tried is wrong, this message will appear:
          DMKLOG050E PASSWORD INCORRECT
If there is already somebody logged in on the account you've tried, you will get this message:
          DMKLOG054E ALREADY LOGGED ON {LINE|GRAF|LUNAME} raddr
     Once you've gotten a correct usernameppassword combination, you will be greeted with this line:
          LOGMSG- hh:mm:ss mmdddyyy
This indicates when the system logon message was most recently revised.  Then the system logon message will be displayed, and you will be told if you have any files waiting for you in your 'reader' (which will be explained later).  This message will look 
like this:
          FILES: {nnn|NO} RDR, {nnn|NO} PRT, {nnn|NO} PUN
One important thing to look for is one of the following messages:
          LOGON AT hh:mm:ss zone weekday mmdddyyy
          RECONNECTED AT hh:mm:ss zone weekday mmdddyyy
RECONNECTED means that you have ben re-connected to a session that was stopped using the 'DISC' command instead of just logging out.  You should get off this as soon as possible, as the person who disconnected probably will be wanting to get back onto the
ir account.
 
     Now that you know how to log into the system, you are ready for some of the more basic commands of the operating system.
 
QUERY
-----
     The QUERY command is used to get various bits of information about your session on the machine, and various other system statistics.  There are many options associated with this command, and only a few of them will be described here.  (Note: the QUER
Y command can be abbreviated to just 'Q')
     Q TIME - display the current time and date on the screen
     Q Reader|PRinter|PUnch - displays on the screen files, if any, in the
       reader.
     Q DISK [mode] - Gives information about the various 'minidisks' attached
       to the session at one time.
     Q SEARCH - Similar to Q DISK.
     Q USERS - Tell how many users are logged on to the system.
     Q NAMES - give the usernames and terminal addresses of all users logged
       onto the system.
 
LISTFILE [<fn> <ft> [<fm>]]
---------------------------
     The LISTFILE will give a list of all or some of the files on one of the minidisks attached.  The wildcard character '*' can be used to search for groups of files with a certain filenameffiletype.
 
GIME <label> [<cuu>] [<fm>]
---------------------------
     The GIME command will attach another user's (or the system's) disk to your session. <cuu> stands for the 'address' associated with that disk, and <fm> is which 'mode' you want it stuck at.  Modes are from A to Z. <label> is the 'name' associated with
 the particular disk.
 
DROP <fm>
---------
     The DROP command is the opposite of GIME; that is, it will detach a disk from your session.  <fm> is the mode where the disk was GIME'd.
 
BASIC
-----
     This will invoke the IBM BASIC interpreter, which is, if you ask me, severely brain-damaged.  I would avoid it.
 
FORTVS <fn>
-----------
     This invokes the IBM VS FORTRAN-77 compiler.  The file <fn> should have a filetype of FORTRAN.  The compiler will generate a file called <fn> TEXT, which contains the equivalent of an .OBJ file (for you CPMM and MS-DOS users) or a .REL file.
 
LOAD <fn> (START
----------------
     This will load the file <fn> TEXT into memory and begin execution.
 
TELL <user> <message>
---------------------
     This command will send <message> to <user>.  Pretty basic.  If the user isn't logged on, the operating system will tell you.
 
LOGOFF
------
     Self-explanatory.
 
DISCONNECT
----------
     This command will disconnect your terminal from your session, but still leave the session logged onto the system, in 'DSC' mode.  You can re-log on to your session using the 'LOGON' command, and return to the same place you were at when you disconnec
ted.  Handy if you have to go off somewhere but don't want to destroy the environment you have set up.
 
RECEIVE [<id#>]
---------------
     The RECEIVE command is used to read files in your 'reader' onto your minidisk.  Each file in the reader has an id# associated with it, and this is how you read in the file.  If no id# is supplied by the user, the system will just RECEIVE the first fi
le in the reader.
 
 
CONCLUSION
==========
     That's about it for Part 1, look for Part 2 soon.  More system commands will be explored, as well as networking of VMSSP systems and some priveliged commands.
 
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=============
VMSSP SYSTEMS
=============
BY
THE MOTORHEAD
(PART 2)
 
     IN PART ONE WE DISCUSSES SOME OF THE BASIC COMMANDS INVOLVED WITH THE SYSTEM, INCLUDING HOW TO LOG ON AND OFF, HOW TO GET A LIST OF THE FILES CONTAINED ON A DIRECTORY, HOW TO SEE WHO'S LOGGED ON, ETC.  IN THIS PART WE WILL INVESTIGATE SOME OF THE MOR
E COMPLEX COMPONENTS OF THE VM SYSTEM, INCLUDING RSCS NETWORKING, PRIVELIGED COMMANDS, HOW TO ANNOY PEOPLE, ETC. ETC.
 
PRIVILEGE CLASSES
=================
     A VM SYSTEM USES WHAT ARE CALLED PRIVILEGE CLASSES TO DETERMINE WHICH COMMANDS A USER CAN USE.  THEY RANGE FROM A TO G.  THE MEANINGS OF THE DIFFERENT CLASSES ARE AS FOLLOWS:
 
A     PRIMARY SYSTEM OPERATOR.
B     SYSTEM RESOURCE OPERATOR.
C     SYSTEM PROGRAMMER.
D     SPOOLING OPERATOR.
E     SYSTEM ANALYST.
F     SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE.
G     GENERAL USER.
 
MOST USERS ARE CLASS G, WITH VARYING NUMBERS OF USERS BEING B,C,D,E,F.  THERE IS ONE IMPORTANT CLASS A USER, KNOWN AS 'MASTEROP'.  THIS IS A SPECIAL USERNAME THAT IS LOGGED ONTO THE SYSTEM CONSOLE, AND CAN DO BASICALLY ANYTHING ON THE SYSTEM.  CLASS C USE
RS CAN MODIFY REAL STORAGE (AS OPPOSED TO VIRTUAL STORAGE), WHICH CAN HAVE PARTICULARLY NASTY CONSEQUENCES, IF THE 'RIGHT' AREAS OF STORAGE ARE ALTERED IN A CERTAIN FASHION.  YOU MUST BE VERY CAREFUL WHEN FIDDLING WITH REAL STORAGE.
 
DETACH {REALADDR} [FROM] {SOMETHING}
     THE DETACH COMMAND (CLASS B) CAN BE USED TO DETACH REAL DEVICES FROM THE SYSTEM, SUCH AS PRINTERS, DISK DRIVES, TERMINALS, ETC.  {REALADDR} IS THE REAL ADDRESS OF THE DEVICE, AND {SOMETHING} CAN BE EITHER A USERID OR SYSTEM.  THIS COMMAND CAN BE VERY
 NASTY, AND CAN CAUSE LOTS OF PROBLEMS.
 
DISABLE {RADDR|SNA|ALL}
     THE DISABLE COMMAND (CLASS A OR B) CAN BE USED TO PREVENT CERTAIN TERMINALS (OR ALL TERMINALS) FROM LOGGING ONTO THE SYSTEM.  PARTICULARLY NASTY.  THE OPPOSITE OF THIS COMMAND IS, OBVIOUSLY, ENABLE.
 
FORCE USERID
     THE FORCE (CLASS A) COMMAND WILL FORCIBLY LOG OFF ANY USER SPECIFIED.  THIS COMMAND IS MOSTLY USED TO FREE TERMINALS WHERE SOMEONE'S SESSION MIGHT HAVE BECOME SCREWED UP, BUT IT CAN ALSO BE USED TO JUST CREATE GENERAL HAVOC (I.E. TERMINATING SYSTEM J
OBS, ETC).
 
MESSAGE {ALL|USERID|*|OPERATOR} MSG
     THE MESSAGE COMMAND (CLASS A OR B) IS USED TO SEND A TEXT MESSAGE TO A SPECIFIED USER, THE PRIMARY SYSTEM OPERATOR (WHOEVER IT MIGHT BE), OR TO ALL USERS LOGGED ONTO THE SYSTEM.
 
MSGNOH {USERID|ALL|*} MSG
     THE MSGNOH COMMAND (CLASS B) WILL SEND MESSAGES TO SPECIFIED USERS OR ALL USERS WITHOUT THE STANDARD HEADER ASSOCIATED WITH REGULAR TERMINAL MESSAGES.  THIS IS NORMALLY USED BY SOME SYSTEM JOB THAT MIGHT SEND YOU A MESSAGE, BUT CAN ALSO BE USED TO AN
ONYMOUSLY HASSLE PEOPLE.  I'D AVOID USING IT ON THE SYSTEM OPERATOR.
 
WARNING {USERID|OPERATOR|ALL} MSG
     THE WARNING COMMAND (CLASS A OR B) SENDS A HIGH-PRIORITY MESSAGE TO A DESIGNATED USER, OR TO ALL THE USERS ON THE SYSTEM.  THIS MESSAGE WILL INTERRUPT ANYTHING THAT IS CURRENTLY BEING DONE, UNLIKE THE MESSAGE COMMAND WHICH WILL WAIT FOR TERMINAL INPU
T BEFORE IT IS DISPLAYED.
 
THE HELP FACILITY
-----------------
     VMSSP SYSTEMS HAVE A VERY EXTENSIVE HELP FACILITY, WHICH WILL GIVE INFORMATION ON JUST ABOUT EVERY COMMAND IN THE SYSTEM, ALONG WITH MANY OF THE PROGRAMS, COMPILERS, ETC. THAT MAY BE RESIDENT ON THE SYSTEM.  THIS CAN BE VERY HELPFUL IF YOU'RE EVER MY
STIFIED BY THE FORMAT OF A CERTAIN COMMAND.  TO GET HELP ON A CERTAIN COMMAND, JUST TRY HELP COMMAND.  IF THIS DOESN'T PROVIDE ANYTHING, THEN THERE IS ALSO THE AID FACILITY, WHICH CAN POINT YOU TOWARDS HELP ON BROADER SUBJECTS.  THE COMBINATION OF HELP AN
D AID HELP TO MAKE VMSSP ONE OF THE MOST USER-FRIENDLY OPERATING SYSTEMS AROUND.  HELP EVEN GIVES INFORMATION ON SOME PRIVILEGED COMMANDS.
 
RSCS AND NETWORKING
-------------------
     VMSSP SYSTEMS USE A METHOD OF NETWORKING COMPUTERS TOGETHER KNOWN AS RSCS.  USING RSCS (WHICH IS THE NAME OF A SYSTEM JOB THAT RUNS IN DISCONNECT MODE), THE SYSTEM CAN TRANSMIT FILES, USER MESSAGES, MAIL, PRINT JOBS, ETC., TO REMOTE COMPUTERS. THE RS
CS MACHINE CAN BE GIVEN COMMANDS TO PERFORM SOME TASKS FOR A USER, SUCH AS LOOKING ON OTHER COMPUTERS TO SEE WHO'S LOGGED ON, ETC.  COMMANDS ARE TRANSMITTED WITH THE SMSG RSCS COMMAND.  FOR INSTANCE, IF YOU WANTED TO SEE WHO WAS LOGGED ONTO A REMOTE COMPU
TER CALLED 'FRITZ', YOU WOULD ISSUE THE FOLLOWING COMMAND:
     SMSG RSCS CMD FRITZ QUERY NAMES
FOR MORE INFORMATION ON RSCS COMMANDS, YOU CAN ALWAYS CHECK OUT THE HELP AND AID FACILITIES.
 
SYSTEM DISKS
------------
     THE SYSTEM USUALLY HAS DISKS THAT ARE AUTOMATICALLY ATTACHED TO YOUR SESSION WHEN YOU LOG IN, AND ARE MOST LIKELY TO BE LOCATED AT MODES S,T,U,W,Y.  THESE DISKS CONTAIN THE VARIOUS 'EXTERNAL' COMMANDS (LIKE 'EXTERNAL' COMMANDS IN MS-DOS), IMPORTANT P
ROGRAMS (SUCH AS THE EDITOR, XEDIT), COMPILERS, ETC.  YOU MUST BE CAREFUL NOT TO DROP THESE DISKS, ESPECIALLY THE S DISK (OR THE ONE LOCATED AT CUU 190 IF IT ISN'T AT S), AS IF YOU DO, YOU MIGHT RUN INTO TROUBLE.
 
CONCLUSION
==========
     THAT'S ABOUT IT FOR PART 2.  PART 3 WILL COVER ANY SUBJECTS THAT I'VE FORGOTTEN TO COVER IN THIS PART AND IN PART 1.  HAPPY HACKING!
 
** THE HAUNTED HOUSE 4159941-7256 **
**   AND THE HH AE 4158858-2840   **



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