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TUCoPS :: Antique Systems :: vax_6.txt

Hacking Vax Part 6





Subject:   What's Hacking VAX Special - 6
From:      David Lightman (Level 30) [A dude who wanted access]
To:        ALL
Sent:      3/1/90 at 2:58 pm



        SET DEFAULT (or... MOVING AROUND A VAX):
        =======================================

           To move around the VAX DCL, in and out of directories, I  need
        to  tell you about the SET DEFAULT command.  It is just like  the
        CD command on UNIX and MS-DOS/PC-DOS, except it follows a format.
        The format is "SET DEFAULT [.subdir]" to go down to a sub  direc-
        tory and "SET DEFAULT [-]" to go to the parent directory.  I will
        explain more involved uses like changing disks, if asked, to keep
        you  out of trouble for now.  First, I will show by  example  and
        then explain my example to those out there who lack a brain.

        $ DIR                                                 (step 1)
        PROGRAM.EXE;2   PROGRAM.EXE;1
        $ CREATE/DIR example                                  (step 2)
        $ DIR                                                 (step 3)
        EXAMPLE.DIR;1   PROGRAM.EXE;2   PROGRAM.EXE;1
        $ SET DEFAULT [.example]                              (step 4)
        $ DIR                                                 (step 5)
        no files, animals, vegetables, nor minerals error
        $ SET DEF [-]                                         (step 6)
        $ COPY PROGRAM.EXE;2 [.example]                       (step 7)
        $ SET DEF [.example]                                  (step 8)
        $ DIR                                                 (step 9)
        PROGRAM.EXE;2
        $

        Here's what I did...

           STEP 1:  I asked to see the contents of the current directory.
                    I  found that I have the program PROGRAM.EXE  is  the
                    1st and 2st versions in the directory.

           STEP 2:  I  created a  directory called "EXAMPLE."  This  name
                    can be anything of course.

           STEP 3:  I again asked for the contents of the directory.   It
                    now   shows   me  that  I  have   a   "file"   called
                    "EXAMPLE.DIR;1."   That is just the directory.   Any-
                    thing with an extension of "DIR" will be a directory.
                    For more on extensions, see below.

           STEP 4:  I  changed directories  by use  of  the  SET  DEFAULT
                    command.   You  must  always follow  this  format  to
                    change into a SUB directory.

           STEP 5:  I AGAIN (!) looked into the directory.  This time, my
                    directory  was  EXAMPLE so I of course  saw  nothing.
                    You  will get an error I believe when you try to  DIR
                    an empty directory.

           STEP 6:  This command is used to rise up to the parent  direc-
                    tory.   The  parent directory contains  the  filename
                    "EXAMPLE.DIR;1," remember?  The DEFAULT option can be
                    shortened to DEF.

           STEP 7:  Here I am illustrating how to move programs around  a
                    little.  I just copied the program PROGRAM.EXE;2 into
                    the subdirectory EXAMPLE.

           STEP 8:  See step 3.   (a lazy, tired Dave)

           STEP 9:  I  >ONCE MORE<  issued the DIR command to  reveal the
                    contents  of the directory.  I now find  the  program
                    PROGRAM.EXE;2  in  my  directory listing  of  my  sub
                    directory EXAMPLE.

           If  you don't understand the basics of moving around a VAX  by
        now, push "OFF".



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