Visit our newest sister site!
Hundreds of free aircraft flight manuals
Civilian • Historical • Military • Declassified • FREE!


TUCoPS :: Radio :: sarex.txt

Nasa-sts31 ham radio information..v.good




HAM RADIO INFORMATION

SHUTTLE AMATEUR RADIO EXPERIMENT (SAREX)
 
SAREX-II-01  is  a secondary payload on STS-35, currently scheduled for
launch on May 9, 1990. It will be located in the Aft Flight Deck of the
Space Shuttle Columbia.  Ron Parise, WA4SIR, the Payload Specialist and
astronomer on Columbia  will  be  the  Astronaut  ham  operator,  using
Configuration C, explained in the Payload Description section below.

SAREX-II-02  is  a secondary payload on STS-37, currently scheduled for
launch on November 1, 1990.  It will be located in the Aft Flight  Deck
of  the  Space  Shuttle  Atlantis.   Ken  Cameron, KB5AWP, the pilot of
Atlantis will be the Astronaut ham  operator,  using  Configuration  D,
explained in the Payload Description section below.

The  American  Radio Relay League (ARRL) is the customer on the SAREXII
payloads.  NASA  gave its authorization for SAREX  operations  for  the
following reasons:

    To  encourage  our  youth  to  become  excited  about  science  and
    technology, and

    To familiarize large numbers of  the  general  public  with  manned
    space flight

NASA's intent in making astronauts available for SAREX operations is to
involve   the   largest   possible   numbers  of  people,  particularly
youngsters, in Amateur Radio and the US space  program.   With  Amateur
Radio  Clubs  and hams, our astronauts will speak over the ham airwaves
directly with large groups of students, showing teachers,  parents  and
communities  how  Amateur  Radio  energizes  youngsters  about science,
technology, and learning.

You can easily become a part of this activity in your local schools, as
the astronauts will operate the SAREX equipment on  the  2-meter  band.
You will be able to send and receive messages via packet for periods of
about  12  hours  daily.  The astronauts' work schedules will determine
your chances for a voice or television message, but  Ron  and  Ken  may
have an hour or more each day for these modes.

The  Johnson  Space  Center's  Amateur  Radio  Club  station, W5RRR, in
Houston, Texas, will re-transmit  astronaut's  signals  to  WA3NAN,  at
Goddard  Space  Flight  Center, in Greenbelt, MD (near Washington, DC),
and to W6VIO, at  the  Jet  Propulsion  Lab  in  Pasadena,  CA.   These
stations,  plus  W1AW  and  several  VHF  and UHF repeater groups, will
re-transmit the signals on most amateur  bands  so  that  you  and  the
students  can  copy  the  communications.   You  will hear NASA Mission
Commentary, frequent bulletins to advise listeners of astronaut-planned
transmissions, and all amateur two-way  voice  and  amateur  television
transmissions with the shuttles.  Using a simple hand-held transceiver,
you  can open the world of science to hundreds of youngsters.  Students
themselves can take part in the shuttle flight via  a  packet  message,
and some will even be able to talk directly to the astronauts in orbit.

ARRL  and  AMSAT  are co-sponsoring these exciting missions, with AMSAT
heading up technical operations.  Hundreds of Amateur  Radio  operators
have already been working behind the scenes for months.
The ARRL takes the lead with information and educational support.  ARRL
Educational  Activities  Branch  (EAB)  and  NASA HQ will create lesson
plans for teachers.  All you need to provide is  a  2-meter  rig  or  a
packet  radio  setup.  If you are a teacher or instructor, contact ARRL
EAB to get everything you will need and regular news updates.   If  you
are  a  parent  or  a grandparent, contact ARRL EAB and a local school.
EAB will send you materials, including ways to  convince  teachers  and
school administrators that Amateur Radio is an important discipline the
school should take advantage of on a full-time basis.

This  a  tremendous  opportunity  for  you  to  showcase SAREX 1990 and
Amateur Radio to kids of all ages in a big way.  Plan on being  a  part
of  it;  contact  ARRL EAB now and give your best to our exciting hobby
and to our hope for tomorrow: America's youth. 

The above info can be found in the February 1990 ARRL magazine  QST  on
page 46.

Write to Rosalie White, WA1STO, the ARRL Educational Coordinator at

    ARRL Headquarters       Phone (203) 666-1541, Ask for Rosalie
    225 Main St.
    Newington, CT 06111

Listen  to  the  ARRL  Bulletins  on  W1AW  (see  QST  for CW and voice
bulletins) on a daily basis; and to the AMSAT  International  Satellite
Nets  on  Tuesdays,  3.840  MHz, 0130Z to 0300Z, and on Sundays, 14.282
MHz, 1800Z to 2100Z, +/- QRM.

See preliminary Keplerian elements for  ASTRO-1,  SAREXII-01  and  GRO,
SAREXII-02 at end of this message.

PAYLOAD DESCRIPTION AND MISSION OVERVIEW
 
This  section  contains  a  general  payload  description and a mission
overview.  It is not intended to specify  requirements  or  constraints
that should be specified in other sections. 

Payload Description

Configuration  A  -  SAREX-II  configuration  A  consists of a suite of
amateur radio equipment, much of which was flown previously on STS-51 F
and prior to that as a reduced capability configuration  (configuration
B)  on  STS-9.   Configuration  A  is comprised of a low power handheld
Frequency  Modulation  (FM)  transceiver,  a   pare  battery  set,   an
Interface  (I/F)  module,  an  SAREX  headset  assembly,  an  equipment
assembly cabinet, a Television  (TV)  camera  and  monitor,  a  Payload
General Support Computer (PGSC) and an antenna capable of being mounted
in  one  of  the Orbiter's flight deck windows.  The equipment assembly
houses power supplies, a  Slow  Scan  Television  (SSTV)  converter,  a
packet  radio  Terminal Node Controller (TNC) and switches and displays    
necessary to control the equipment as well as connectors to connect  it
to other equipment comprising configuration A.
 
SAREX-II configuration A is capable of communicating with amateur radio
stations  within Line Of Sight (LOS) of the Orbiter in any one of three
modes, e.g., voice, SSTV  or  data.   In  the  latter  two  modes,  the
equipment  can  be  operated  either  attended  or  unattended.  In the
attended method  of  operation,  the  operator  manually  provides  the
equipment with TV pictures (using the TV
camera)  or computer data (using the PGSC keyboard) and observes the TV
picture on the monitor or printed text via the  PGSC  screen.   In  the
unattended  method  of  operation,  the operator sets up the equipment,
turns the equipment on and selects the operating  mode.   The  operator
then  attends  to  other duties with only occasional observation of the
SAREX-II equipment operation.
 
The function of each of the SAREX-II configuration A equipment suite is
summarized as follows:
 
a.  Handheld transceiver - Receives and transmits  FM  voice,  SSTV  or
    packet  radio  signals  in  the  two meter (144 to 146 MHz) Amateur
    Band.
 
b.  I/F module - Serves to  provide  a  means  of  interconnecting  the
    SAREX-II equipment with the standard crew microphone/headset or the
    SAREX  headset  assembly  and standard crew personal tape recorder.
    The I/F module also interconnects the handheld transceiver with the
    equipment assembly cabinet.
 
c.  Equipment assembly cabinet -  Houses  the  SSTV  converter,  packet
    radio TNC, power supplies and switches, displays and connectors.
 
    1.      SSTV converter - Takes normal TV from the camera or Shuttle
            TV  distribution  system and makes still pictures which can
            be transmitted in a voice bandwidth radio circuit and takes
            still TV frames transmitted up on a voice  bandwidth  radio
            circuit  and  converts  them  for  viewing on a standard TV
            monitor.
 
    2.      Packet  TNC  -  Interconnects  a  computer  with  a   radio
            transceiver  so  that  data  to  and  from  the computer is
            transmitted to and received from other stations  in  bursts
            of  characters  using a special amateur developed protocol.
            This  protocol  includes  error  correction   and   station
            addressing features.
 
d.  TV camera - Allows scenes in the Orbiter as well as external scenes
    available  through  the various windows to be televised and sent to
    the SSTV converter.
 
e.  TV monitor - Allows viewing of TV pictures from the SSTV converter.
 
f.  Antenna - Permits the  radio  signals  to  and  from  the  handheld
    transceiver  to  be  transmitted  and  received  through one of the    
    Orbiter's windows while limiting the leakage of Radiofrequency (RF)
    energy into the cabin.
 
g.  PGSC - Serves as a data terminal for the packet  radio  portion  of
    the experiment.

h.  Associated  cables  -  Interconnect the various pieces of equipment
    making up the SAREX-II configuration A suite of equipment.
 
i.  SAREX headset assembly.
 
j.  Personal tape recorder - to record contacts.

Configuration B  -  SAREX-II  configuration  B  consists  only  of  the
handheld  transceiver,  I/F  module,  spare  battery set, SAREX headset
assembly, personal tape recorder, and the window antenna. It is capable
only of exchanging voice communications with  amateur  stations  within
LOS  of  the  Orbiter.  Configuration  B  can  be  operated only in the
attended mode.

Configuration C - SAREX-II configuration C  consists  of  the  handheld
transceiver,  I/F  module,  PGSC,  spare  battery  set, window antenna,
packet module, SAREX  headset  assembly,  personal  recorder,  and  the
required  cable  assemblies.  The packet module contains a power supply
and packet TNC.  The power supply provides power for the  TNC  and  the
handheld  transceiver.   The TNC interconnects with a radio transceiver
so that data to and from the computer is transmitted  to  and  received
from  other  amateur  rado  stations.   Configuration  C  is capable of
operating in either the voice  or  data  mode  in  communications  with
amateur stattions within LOS of the Orbiter.  This configuration can be
operated  in  the  attended mode for voice communication and either the
attended or automatic mode for data communications.

Configuration D - SAREX-II configuration D is the same as configuration
A except that a Fast Scan Television (FSTV)  module  is  added  to  the
antenna assembly.  The FSTV module contains a receiving RF preamplifier
and  a  video  decoder  that  provides  NTSC  video for SAREX-II.  This
configuration communicates with amateur  stations  within  LOS  of  the
Orbiter  in  one  of four modes, e.g., voice, SSTV, data, or FSTV.  The
voice mode is operated in the attended mode while SSTV, data,  or  FSTV
can be operated in either the attended or unattended mode.

Note  1:   This  band  is  also  part  of the Amateur Satellite Service
frequency  allocations  established  on  a  worldwide  basis   by   the
International Telecommunications Union (ITU).

Mission Overview

Integrated Ground Operations.- After the payload is initially prepared,
it  is transported to the Orbiter integration facility.  The payload is
installed in the Orbiter at the launch pad.

Flight Operations.- Operation in-flight will be limited to usage during
off-duty hours by licensed crewmembers.  Upon completion  of  in-flight    
operation  activities,  the  equipment  will  be returned to its flight
stowage position(s) for landing. 

Postlanding.- After landing, the payload is removed  from  the  Orbiter
and returned to the customer at JSC.

MISSION OPERATIONS
 
The  mission  operations  section includes a definition of requirements
and constraints by mission phase.

Payload Control Parameters
 
The payload control weight and payload control  dimensions  define  the
maximum  weight and dimensions of the payload for NSTS mission planning
purposes.  A payload may not  exceed  its  control  weight  or  control
dimensions without NSTS approval.  
 
The payload control weights are as follows:
 
Configuration A      60 lb  (27.21 kg)
Configuration B      35 lb  (15.90 kg)
Configuration C      45 lb  (20.41 kg)
Configuration D      70 lb  (31.75 kg)
 
All configuration A and D payload equipment, except the window antenna,
will  be stowed in one and one half middeck locker volumes.  The window
antenna  will  be  stowed  in  the  Orbiter  window  shade  bag.    All
configuration  B  and  C  payload equipment, except the window antenna,
will be stowed in one half locker volume.  The window antenna  will  be
stowed in the Orbiter window shade bag.
 
For  configurations  A,  C,  and  D  a  PGSC can be used to provide the
middeck SPOC function which would eliminate the requirement to carry  a
second  SPOC.   In  this  configuration SAREX-II would be operated on a
non-interference basis with SPOC requirements.


Operational Requirements and Constraints

The following payload operational requirements and constraints will  be
used  in  the  flight  planning  and  implementation of the STS/payload
mission.  Requirements that impose flight design and/or  crew  activity
constraints  will be implemented to the extent practical within primary
payload objectives or mission objectives as determined by the NSTS.

Launch Readiness - Prelaunch Constraints:

a.  The payload will be in final lift-off configuration when  installed
    in  the  Orbiter.   At  this  time,  the payload will be capable of
    sustaining this configuration indefinitely without access  or  NSTS
    support.
 
Launch Commit Criteria:  The payload will not constrain launch.

On-orbit.- All SAREX-II operations will be conducted in the 2 m (144 to
146  MHz)  Amateur  Satellite  Service band utilizing FM with a nominal
frequency deviation of 5 kHz.  The specific frequencies to be used  are
contained in annex 1.
 
Operating  times  for  the  SAREX-II  payload  will  be  such as to not
interfere with any  other  planned  mission  activities.   The  payload
operating  times  will  be  logged  via the standard crew personal tape
recorder or the PGSC, as appropriate.  The customer will  identify  the
desired  ground  locations  expected  to  be  used for SAREX-II payload
operations prior to the flight.


PRELIMINARY SAREX ELEMENTS

STS-35, ASTRO-1
Epoch time:              90129.25347223     9 May 90 -6:05:00:000 UTC
Element set:             JSC-006
Inclination:             28.4690 deg
RA of Assending Node:    130.7008 deg       Space Shuttle Flight 
Eccentricity:            .0005720           STS-35 Pre-launch flight
Arg of perigee:          246.6067 deg       profile Keplerian Elements
Mean anomaly:            119.6564 deg       Launch:  5/9/90  04:50 UTC
Mean motion:             15.71792660 rev/day
Decay rate:              3.1 E-04 rev/day 2          W5RRR
Epoch rev:                     2            NASA Johnson Space Center


STS-37, GRO, SAREXII-02
Epoch time:              90305.68520255     1 Nov 90 16:26:41:500 UTC
Element set:             JSC-002
Inclination:             28.4616 deg        Space Shuttle Flight
RA of Ascending Node:    99.7418 deg        STS-37 Pre-launch flight
Eccentricity:            .0010911           profile Keplerian Elements
Arg of perigee:          295.9904 deg       Launch: 11/1/90  15:10 UTC
Mean anomaly:            73.6488 deg
Mean motion:             15.37258192 rev/day          W5RRR
Decay rate:              2.3 E-04 rev/day 2 NASA Johnson Space Center
Epoch rev:                      2

Element sets provided by Gil Carman, WA5NOM, JSC ARC, W5RRR President

Watch for updates on the ARRL and AMSAT Packet BBS and the Nets.

Ed Stluka, W4QAU 2/27/90


Note to amateur radio operators:  If Shuttle transmissions are being
rebroadcast in your area, give us the frequencies in a note when you log off
NASA Spacelink.  We'll add your note to this document.



Response(s) to the note above:


========NASA/SPACELINK MESSAGE======= 10-MAR-89 14:30:04
	From: N6GOZ   Logged on port: @CON5


---------MESSAGE FROM USER-----------
AS AN ADDITION TO YOUR HAM RADIO FREQUENCIES INFORMATION YOU MIGHT INCLUDE TH
E FACT THAT PEOPLE IN THE GREATER SAN FRANSISCO BAY ARE AND SACRAMENTO CAN VI
EW THEMISSION VIA THE W6NKF AMATEUR TELEVISION REPEATER ON MT.DIABLO WHICH OP
ERATES ON 427.250 MHZ WITH THE ANTENNA POLARIZATION BEING VERTICAL.THOSE WITH
CABLE READY TV'S VCR'S OR CABLE CO MPANY BOXES CAN TUNE THIS EQUIPMENT TO CH
ANNEL 58 IN THE CATV FORMAT AND BY HOOKING UP AN OUTSIDE TV ANTENNA SHOULD
BE ABLE TO RECEIVE THE TELECAST.THIS MAKES THE SERVICE AVAILABLE TO THE
GENERAL PUBLIC INCLUDING SCHOOLS,COLLEGES ETC.

============END OF MESSAGE===========



========NASA/SPACELINK MESSAGE======= 11-MAR-89 18:29:30
	From: RYAN   Logged on port: @CON3


---------MESSAGE FROM USER-----------
SHUTTLE AUDIO IS RETRANSMITTED IN THE MINNEAPOLIS/ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA
ON 145.150 MHZ DURING ALL SHUTTLE FLIGHTS.  ADDITIONALLY, DURING SOME
FLIGHTS, THE AUDIO IS ALSO RETRANSMITTED BY THE 3M ARC REPEATER (WB0BQG/R)
ON 147.12 MHZ.

============END OF MESSAGE===========



========NASA/SPACELINK MESSAGE======= 17-MAR-89 08:39:57
	From: DAVERANSOM   Logged on port: @CON3

---------MESSAGE FROM USER-----------
IN THE LOS ANGELES AREA, SHUTTLE AIR-TO-GROUND MAY SOMETIMES BE HEARD
ON VHF AT 145.46 MHZ.

============END OF MESSAGE=========== 17-MAR-89 08:40:54



---------MESSAGE FROM USER-----------
THE WB4LA REPEATER LOCATED IN DAYTON, OH ON THE FREQUENCY OF 145.11
REBROADCASTS NASA SHUTTLE COVERAGE FROM NASA SELECT.

============END OF MESSAGE=========== 04-MAY-89 19:00:02


HERE IN THE PHOENIX AREA WE ARE RECEIVING SHUTTLE COMMUNICATIONS ON
449.000 MHZ. 

============END OF MESSAGE=========== 06-MAY-89 01:15:27


HELLO WAYNE HARRELL WD4LYV WITH THE COASTAL PLAINS AMATEUR RADIO CLUB
WE HAVE SHUTTLE AUDIO ON THE WD4EVD REPEATER IN SOUTH GEORGIA
REPEATER IS LOCATED AT ASHBURN GA. NEAR I-75
147.285 IS THE FREQ.

============END OF MESSAGE=========== 05-MAY-89 18:58:12



---------MESSAGE FROM USER-----------
DURING STS MISSIONS, NASA SELECT AUDIO IS AVAILABLE ON AMATEUR RADIO REPEATER
WD6BNO/R TRANSMITTING ON 52.22 MHZ  WITH COVERAGE IN THE CENTRAL SAN JOAQUIN
VALLEY, CALIFORNIA. COVERAGE INCLUDES BAKERSFIELD TO STOCKTON. ENJOY!!

============END OF MESSAGE=========== 06-MAY-89 00:42:19


---------MESSAGE FROM USER-----------
HERE IS A FREQUENCY TO ADD TO YOUR HAM LISTINGS OF NASA REBROADCASTS.
THE AMES AMATEUR CLUB RE-BROADCASTS NASA SELECT AUDIO ON 145.580 MHZ 2M FM.
THE SIGNAL ORIGINATES FROM THE NASA-AMES RESEARCH CENTER IN THE HEART 
OF THE SILICON VALLEY, MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA.
NASA SELECT VIDEO IS AVAILABLE FOR THOSE WHO HAVE LINE-OF-SIGHT
TO BLACK MOUNTAIN  VIA AMATEUR TV.  FOR ATV DETAILS
MAIL TO: AMES AMATEUR CLUB, P.O. BOX 73, MOFFETT FIELD, CA., 94035-0073.

============END OF MESSAGE=========== 10-OCT-89 15:24:36




---------MESSAGE FROM USER-----------
JOHNSON SPACE CENTER SUPPLIES
A NASA SELECT AUDIO ON 146.64 MHZ 2M FM (W5RRR REPEATER).

============END OF MESSAGE=========== 10-OCT-89 18:07:44





---------MESSAGE FROM USER-----------
FROM WB4CXD- SHUTTLE AUDIO CAN BE HEARD IN BIRMINGHAM, AL ON
145.38 (DIRECT) AND VIA N4AHN REPEATER ON 145.15 MHZ.

============END OF MESSAGE=========== 10-OCT-89 22:23:49


---------MESSAGE FROM USER-----------
MESSAGE FOR HAM RADIO SECTION:
..
IF VISITING THE "MILA" (MERITT ISLAND LAUNCH AREA) AT CAPE CANAVERAL,
YOU CAN HEAR LAUNCH, AND AIR-TO-GROUND ON THE K4GCC REPEATER AT 
146.94 MHZ. THIS IS A HAM RADIO REPEATER WHICH CARRIES THE "USUAL
INANE HAM CHATTER" UNTILL SOMETHING COMES DOWN THE NASA SELECT AUDIO
FEED. THEN THE FEED OVERRIDES THE REPEATERS INPUT FREQUENCY, AND THE 
NASA FEED IS BROADCAST. SO DON'T GET FRUSTRATED THAT THESE RATCHET-
JAWS ARE HOGGING THE AIR, IT JUST MEANS NOTHING IS HAPPENNING YET.

============END OF MESSAGE=========== 11-OCT-89 12:57:11

---------MESSAGE FROM USER-----------
NASA SELECT IS ON 444.3 (NN0V) AND 146.40 IN THE CEDAR RAPIDS IOWA AREA.
FOR THIS MISSION (STS34) IT HAS BEEN ON 444.3 ONLY. WE KNOW OF QUITE
A FEW LISTENERS FOR THIS; ALSO MAY BE ON COX CABLE CH 13 (KTS).

============END OF MESSAGE=========== 18-OCT-89 21:16:09




---------MESSAGE FROM USER-----------
WE WILL BE RETRANSMITTING STS-32 AUDIO IN MAIN VIA HAM RADIO ON
224.84 MHZ K1MON/R MT AGAMENTICUS , YORK MAINE
AND 146.925 KA1SSZ/R PORTLAND MAINE

============END OF MESSAGE=========== 16-DEC-89 06:28:36

---------MESSAGE FROM USER-----------
NASA SELECT AUDIO IS REBROADCAST IN THE LOS ANGELES AREA ON
THE FOLLOWING FREQUENCIES:
145.46  MHZ
224.04  MHZ
448.825 MHZ
NASA SELECT VIDEO IS REBROADCAST FROM THE MT. WILSON REPEATER
K6KMN AT A FREQUENCY OF:  1241.25  MHZ

============END OF MESSAGE=========== 21-DEC-89 16:43:13



---------MESSAGE FROM USER-----------
IN WASECA, MINNESOTA,NASA SELECT AUDIO CAN BE FOUND ON 147.45 MHZ.
VIDEO IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON 427.25 MHZ.

============END OF MESSAGE=========== 02-JAN-90 23:55:15


---------MESSAGE FROM USER-----------
A  "CLEAN"  (NO CHATTER OR OTHER TRAFFIC) RETRANSMISSION  OF  NASA  
SELECT  AUDIO CAN BE HEARD IN THE LOS ANGELES AREA ON  52.640  AND 
448.825.   THE  SAME  SIGNALS  ARE SUPPLIED T224.940 AND  TO  THE 
CACTUS  SYSTEM.   THE CACTUS  SYSTEM  USUALLY CARRIES THIS FEED TO 
THE FOLLOWING  AREAS  AND FREQUENCIES.
SANTA BARBARA     449.000              SAN JOSE       443.550
SAN DIEGO         448.625 & 448.675    EAST DESERT    448.650
LOS ANGELES       449.000 & 448.650    BLYTHE         448.975
PHOENIX           449.000 & 448.975    TUSCON         448.625
SW/SE NEW MEXICO  449.000 ; 448.975 ; 448.675 ; 448.650 ; 448.625
EL PASO           448.650              LAS VEGAS      449.000
CEDAR CITY        448.650              SALT LAKE      448.625
SOME  OF THE MORE OUTLYING STATIONS MAY NOT COVER ALL THE  MISSION  
BUT USUALLY ARE ON LINE DURING LAUNCH AND LANDING.  OTHER  AMATEUR  
TRAFFIC WILL BE HEARD ALONG WITH THE MISSION AUDIO.    DE WA6CDR

============END OF MESSAGE=========== 07-JAN-90 03:56:19


---------MESSAGE FROM USER-----------
IN REGARD TO NASA SELECT REBROADCASTS, IN CENTRAL MINN, 149.200 MHZ
ON A BEAM ANTENNA TOWARDS MPLS WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH GOOD COVERAGE WITHIN
APPX 120 KM OF MPLS.  THIS WAS NOT FOUND TO BE CONSISTANT, AND RECEPTION IN 
ST. CLOUD WAS FAIR.

============END OF MESSAGE=========== 19-FEB-90 12:22:57



---------MESSAGE FROM USER-----------
NASA SELECT MAY NOW ALSO BE HEARD ON THE 146.790 WA8KZR HAM REPEATER
IN GREENVILLE OHIO.

============END OF MESSAGE=========== 11-MAR-90 10:45:13


---------MESSAGE FROM USER-----------

IN THE NORTHERN CALIF. AREA SPACE SHUTTLE CAN BE HEARD ON 154.530 MHZ. ON THE
WA6IEO REMOTE BASE. 12 WATTS TRANSMITTING FROM AN ALTITUDE OF 3200 FEET.



============END OF MESSAGE=========== 19-MAR-90 00:03:41


THE REPEATER FREQUENCY FOR THE CHICAGO AREA FOR SHUTTLE SPACE FLIGHTS IS
145.210 MHZ.  
                                                                                    05-MAY-89 18:58:12



---------MESSAGE FROM USER-----------
DURING STS MISSIONS, NASA SELECT AUDIO IS AVAILABLE ON AMATEUR RADIO REPEATER
WD6BNO/R TRANSMITTING ON 52.22 MHZ  WITH COVERAGE IN THE CENTRAL SAN JOAQUIN
VALLEY, CALIFORNIA. COVERAGE INCLU


TUCoPS is optimized to look best in Firefox® on a widescreen monitor (1440x900 or better).
Site design & layout copyright © 1986-2014 AOH